The Role of Ginsenosides

With the development of analytic science in biology and medicine, people began to seek the molecules that are directly responsible for the therapeutic properties. Since red ginseng has been called “miracle worker” for many, researchers have been doing molecular-based and clinical research on red ginseng extracts to reveal the secret of this human-looking plant, rather than relying on “esoteric medicinal sutra”. With extensive research, the ginsenosides and their metabolites and derivatives were found to be active ingredients of red ginseng’s therapeutic qualities.

Throughout history, red ginseng is known to promote vitality and longevity while providing defense against depression, diabetes, fatigue, ulcers and chronic stress. According to multiple studies, many of these health benefits come from the anti-inflammatory effect of the ginsenosides.

Inflammation is a natural immune response of the body to fight against harmful “external” threats such as pathogens, irritations or infection. Immune system induced inflammation is supposed to be highly regulated and tightly orchestrated process, however an imbalance may result in serious health conditions such as autoimmune diseases or immune deficiency in extreme cases. Especially, chronic inflammation caused by various factors such as injury, infection and prolonged exposure to a toxic environment can promote various diseases such as cancer and diabetes. People living in the busy, stressful and polluted environment often suffer from the unnoticed chronic inflammation and chronic inflammation often compromises overall well-being of people.

KGC Ginsenosides

The good news is ginsenosides in Korean Red Ginseng show excellent immune-regulatory properties. They can control the inflammation on both extremes, inhibiting inflammation inducing cytokines when they are released excessively, yet enhancing immune reactions when they are absolutely necessary. So, if you feel unbalanced, tired or stressed, you can try red ginseng products from KGC filled with ginsenosides and other beneficial ingredients.

Reference

Coussens L.M., Werb Z. Inflammation and cancer. Nature. 2002;420:860–867. [PubMed]

González-Chávez A., Elizondo-Argueta S., Gutiérrez-Reyes G., León-Pedroza J.I. Pathophysiological implications between chronic inflammation and the development of diabetes and obesity. Cir Cir. 2011;79:209–216. [PubMed]

Tracy R. Emerging relationships of inflammation, cardiovascular disease and chronic diseases of aging. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003;27